Supporting Our Computing with Form & Structure

We may well live in the IT Age, in the realm of digital communications and endless computer screens, but we also still need the stability of a damn good table. Desks and dining tables are the bedrock of computing, the structures upon which we rest our magical devices. Those winking, blinking and shimmering screens, with which we deliver our daily labour to and from one another. Ask yourself, where would you be without a proud table beneath you? What would hold up all your technological devices? What surface beneath your laptop or desktop would ideally support your activities?

Supporting Our Computing with Form & Structure

We all assume that we could manage without the solid support of form beneath us, but we are just kidding ourselves. Wooden dining tables and/or desks allow us to dabble in magic with our machines. We are held aloft by ancient structures that have held our ancestors aloft for millennia. We tap away at keyboards and touch screens with soft digits, knowing that stronger forms lie beneath us. One of the most beautiful dichotomies in the modern world is to see a brand spanking new slimline computer borne aloft by a natural wooden dining table.

The contrast between the two forms is quite sexy. The interrelationship, the complementary nature, of old and new links us to this earth to our past and future. When I stroke the textual surface of a wooden table I am transported back in time. When I witness the technological brilliance of a touch screen computer I am rushed forward into tomorrow and beyond. I do not want to lose one or the other, I want to remain the glue between these realities. My mind accelerated in one direction and my soul pulled back into the trees.

Of course, I am a romantic about such things, and not all human beings think and feel as I do. I see the rushing lights of the future, the immaterial digital definition of tomorrow whooshing past on a highway of pixels. My heart sometimes longs for the resin filled stability of timber beneath my hands. The odd splinter brings me back into the here and now. The fact that I could carve my name upon the surface of this table, and score it with a sturdy blade, reminds me of our history. Generations of my family have sat at this fine table and supped at countless meals, spilling more than liquids and conversation. A good table is sometimes hard to find; but they can last a lifetime and beyond.